drmike

drmike's Fitness Profile

from Gilbert, Arizona (outdoors)

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drmike's Journal

  • HealthyBee

    Re: Reflection

    I always find the first week or so of logging my behavior the hardest - first, there's the learning curve of figuring out what to log and how to log it in Gyminee (or anywhere else). Then, once you start getting into the habit you begin observing the inconsistencies and strengths of your activities. Then, it becomes somewhat of a point of reference, not so much a motivator. Interesting thoughts! :)

    Posted over 6 years ago by HealthyBee

  • HealthyBee

    Forums

    You did an excellent job in providing some insightful comments in the forums this week. Your responses were mindful and full of options (especially for the vegetarian topic). In terms of your forum post - it seems you've already gotten some feedback from those who found your question a bit intriguing. How *would* someone from another planet think about our health? Even if we gave them a cookie-cutter answer about what health (or wellness) means to us... would they discover our health discrepancies? What you think is healthy may not be what someone else thinks is healthy. :) Very thought-provoking inquiry.

    Posted over 6 years ago by HealthyBee

  • drmike

    My Reflections

    I learned quite a bit over the past several weeks of logging my food intake/nutrition log. First of which was, it is hard to remember what you ate if you don't write it down. The other thing, more importantly, was that I learned that it takes quite a bit more caloric intake to even just maintain my current weight. I also noticed that my protein intake was always the most challenging for me to get the 'green checkmark' for. I had a similar experience tracking my workouts. I mostly did a bodyweight routine with pushups, walking, running, outdoor activities in the yard and playing volleyball. So, the way I had to get in my exercise needs to be improved. Tracking it regularly showed me my weaknesses in that area. I found Gyminee helpful in that I was able to observe what it takes to consume the level of calories I need in order to put on the amount of muscle I want to add. Gyminee was a way for me to see in a more 'number concrete' sort of way what is necessary in this regard. I also liked the features of selecting various workouts and programs. I'm not sure that I will continue to use this Gyminee program as a regular way of helping me keep fit. But, I will use it to refer back to my comp. workout design and also to periodically check in with my calorie counts, probably more out of curiosity. I appreciated how we were able to monitor many aspects of health, access other workout programs, ask questions to a forum and share in other people's success through this site. I will definitely recommend it to others.

    Posted over 6 years ago by drmike

  • drmike

    FORUMS

    1. General Health (topic), What is your #1 health tip? (question) 2. Diet and Nutrition (topic), Anyone a vegetarian? (question) My topic question created was under the General Health (topic), When you think of health, what do you mean? (question)

    Posted over 6 years ago by drmike

  • HealthyBee

    Re: THR

    Great job in determining your THR. Now when you're exercising, be sure to take a 10 second count and see if you're staying within your THR, aka aerobic zone. This is also said to be the 'fat' burning zone if you stay here over 20 minutes. Most endurance athletes stay in this zone because the body creates ATP from the energy stored in fat cells. And since we have more fat in our bodies than glucose in the muscles, we can last longer. When you reach higher heart rates around 85% of your HRR, then you're beginning to work anaerobically where your body begins to create energy from glucose in the muscles. The by-product of working at an anaerobic state is build-up of lactic acid, which is why people who work too hard are sore the next day or two. FYI Weight training is also considered anaerobic exercise.

    Posted over 6 years ago by HealthyBee

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